Corona Virus

Discussion in 'Discussion Group' started by markfnc, Mar 10, 2020.

  1. markfnc

    markfnc Well-Known Member





    media over hype for ratings.
     
    poppin cork likes this.
  2. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    Dr. Drew needed to get better data, the percentage of critical cased and death rate percentage is much higher than the flu.

    https://www.livescience.com/new-coronavirus-compare-with-flu.html

    Both seasonal flu viruses (which include influenza A and influenza B viruses) and COVID-19 are contagious viruses that cause respiratory illness.

    Typical flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, muscle aches, headaches, runny or stuffy nose, fatigue and, sometimes, vomiting and diarrhea, according to the CDC. Flu symptoms often come on suddenly. Most people who get the flu will recover in less than two weeks. But in some people, the flu causes complications, including pneumonia. So far this flu season, about 1% of people in the United States have developed symptoms severe enough to be hospitalized, which is similar to the rate last season, according to data from the CDC.

    With COVID-19, doctors are still trying to understand the full picture of disease symptoms and severity. Reported symptoms in patients have varied from mild to severe, and can include fever, cough and shortness of breath, according to the CDC.

    In general, studies of hospitalized patients have found that about 83% to 98% of patients develop a fever, 76% to 82% develop a dry cough and 11% to 44% develop fatigue or muscle aches, according to a review study on COVID-19 published Feb. 28 in the journal JAMA. Other symptoms, including headache, sore throat, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, have been reported, but are less common.

    Another recent study, considered the largest on COVID-19 cases to date, researchers from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Protection, analyzed 44,672 confirmed cases in China between Dec. 31, 2019 and Feb. 11, 2020. Of those cases, 80.9% (or 36,160 cases) were considered mild, 13.8% (6,168 cases) severe and 4.7% (2,087) critical. "Critical cases were those that exhibited respiratory failure, septic shock, and/or multiple organ dysfunction/failure," the researchers wrote in the paper published in China CDC Weekly.

    It's important to note that, because respiratory viruses cause similar symptoms, it can be difficult to distinguish different respiratory viruses based on symptoms alone, according to WHO.

    Death rate
    The death rate from seasonal flu is typically around 0.1% in the U.S., according to The New York Times.

    The death rate for COVID-19 appears to be higher than that of the flu.

    In the study published Feb. 18 in the China CDC Weekly, researchers found a death rate from COVID-19 to be around 2.3% in mainland China. Another study of about 1,100 hospitalized patients in China, published Feb. 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that the overall death rate was slightly lower, around 1.4%.

    Still, the death rate for COVID-19 appears to vary by location and an individual's age, among other factors. For instance, in Hubei Province, the epicenter of the outbreak, the death rate reached 2.9%; in other provinces of China, that rate was just 0.4%, according to the China CDC Weekly study. In addition, older adults have been hit the hardest. The death rate soars to 14.8% in those 80 and older; among those ages 70 to 79, the COVID-19 death rate in China seems to be about 8%; it’s 3.6% for those ages 60 to 69; 1.3% for 50 to 59; 0.4% for the age group 40 to 49; and just 0.2% for people ages 10 to 39. No deaths in children under 9 have been reported.

    Though the death rate for COVID-19 is unclear, most research suggests it is higher than that of the seasonal flu.
     
    Sherry A. likes this.
  3. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    A total of 755 confirmed cases of the coronavirus were confirmed nationwide as of Tuesday morning, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University. There have been 26 coronavirus-related deaths in the country, most of them in Washington state.

    26/755*100= 3.44% death rate in the US as of this morning. The death rate for the seasonal flu is 34 times lower and there is a vaccine for the seasonal flu along with decades of data from which to draw an understanding. Covid-19 was literally an unknown until it was first reported 70 days ago.
     
    Sherry A. likes this.
  4. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/world-health-organization-formally-declares-coronavirus-a-pandemic-163331423.html

    World Health Organization formally declares coronavirus a pandemic


    The World Health Organization on Wednesday formally declared the coronavirus a worldwide pandemic, underscoring the pathogen’s inexorable spread across the globe as new cases and deaths rise, in a sobering admission that regional efforts to contain the outbreak have been lost.

    Initially, the WHO resisted characterizing the disease as a pandemic. Yet as COVID-19’s casualty count has mounted, the organization relented. Worldwide infections have surged well above 100,000 and the death toll has spiked above 4,000.

    "We have therefore made the assessment that #COVID19 can be characterized as a pandemic,” said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the World Health Organization’s director general. He added that 90% of the total cases globally are from four countries. That includes China, South Korea and Italy— which just this week was forced to quarantine the entire nation.

    “In the days and weeks ahead, we expect to see the number of Covid-19 cases, the number of deaths, and the number of affected countries climb even higher,” the organization said.
     
  5. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

  6. barney726

    barney726 Well-Known Member

    we already have webmaster thread for this. please combine or delete. thanks
     
  7. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    A sobering conclusion by a UCSF panel on the Covid19 issue:

    "We in the U.S. are currently where Italy was a week ago. We see nothing to say we will be substantially different."
     
  8. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    One seems to be Johnston Co. in particular while this one is the situation in general.
     
  9. Hught

    Hught Well-Known Member

    This one was the first thread and the webmaster probably thought it was an inappropriate thread to just expand on since this thread started with stating the Pandemic was overrated.
     
  10. BuzzMyMonkey

    BuzzMyMonkey Well-Known Member

    LOL
     
    Bluewillow likes this.
  11. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    "We are at a critical inflection point in this country, people. We are where Italy was two weeks ago in terms of our numbers," U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams told Fox News. "When you look at the projections, there's every chance that we could be Italy."

    Two weeks ago, there were 1,700 cases of coronavirus in Italy and the country had reported 34 deaths. Now, Italy is reporting an estimated 25,000 cases and more than 1,800 people have died. There are about 3,800 cases reported in the United States and so far, more than 65 people have died from coronavirus.
     
  12. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

  13. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    Righttttttt ..... and I have a bridge for sale only used by a little old lady to get to church on Sundays.
     
  14. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    Yes, as the Pandemic Response Unit would not have likely been disbanded as it was a couple of years ago.

    You can think anything you like, but the evidence is pretty strong concerning the level of incompetence in this situation.

    Yes, the pandemic would have still happened but the response would have been much faster and more complete from the start.

    And partly because we had nothing set up to respond to the problem and the highest levels of government actually claimed there was no problem.

    Which would have been handling it better by any metric.

    Again, this would make it being handled worse.

    Or not, that depends on who in the government you listen to when they speak on the subject.

    So that is why the previous administration set up the system to react more quickly or why the current administration dismantled it?

    Nope, it does not.
     
  15. markfnc

    markfnc Well-Known Member

  16. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

  17. markfnc

    markfnc Well-Known Member

    you wont hear 1 of those stories on national news. you have to search.
     
  18. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    “Respirators, ventilators, all of the equipment — try getting it yourselves,” Mr. Trump told the governors during the conference call, a recording of which was shared with The New York Times. “We will be backing you, but try getting it yourselves. Point of sales, much better, much more direct if you can get it yourself.”
     
  19. poppin cork

    poppin cork Well-Known Member

    And that's a problem? Did you think the White House is making them? Local usually works faster and more efficient.
     
  20. Wayne Stollings

    Wayne Stollings Well-Known Member

    Not when you are buying large quantities of the same product. Quantity purchases carry more weight and allow for better pricing. That is why a fleet purchaser of vehicles will get better deals and service than a single purchaser.
     

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